June’s Review: A Court of Wings & Ruin

June’s review is here! A Court of Wings and Ruin, by Sarah J. Maas, A review by editor Jessica Rae Wilson-Smith “It’s a rare person to face who they are and not run from it- not be broken by it.” A Court of Wings and Ruin is the third and last installment of Sarah J….

May’s Review: Rubik

May’s Review is here! Rubik, by Elizabeth Tan A review by editor Jessica Gately I was lucky enough to be introduced to this book at its launch at Beaufort Street Books in Mt Lawley. I joined a throng of other local literature lovers as store reps served wine and nibbles and Tan signed copies of…

Issue 18’s Review: Black Hole Blues

Issue 18’s Review Black Hole Blues by Janna Levin A review by editor Jessica Gately (this review can be found in issue 18: Black Hole) The timing of this book falling into my hands could not have been better. Apart from the impending release of this issue of Underground, whose theme is also somewhat coincidentally…

Issue 17’s Review: The Other Woman

Issue 17’s Review The Other Woman by Kylie Jones (self-published) A collaborative review between Shelley Timms, Jessica Wilson-Smith, and Kate Lomas Glendenning (this review can be found in issue 17: The Hitchhiker) The Other Woman is the heart-wrenching true story of a woman coming to terms with her husband transitioning into a woman, and subsequent…

Issue 16’s Review: Am I normal Yet?

Issue 16’s Review Am I Normal Yet? By Holly Bourne A review by editor Jessica Wilson-Smith (this review can be found in issue 16: Normal?) Am I Normal Yet? is a contemporary look at what it’s like to struggle with a mental illnesses and being a young girl in today’s society. As Book 1 of…

Issue 15’s Review: Defiance

Issue 15’s Review Defiance by C. J. Redwine A review by editor Timilehin Adeyemi (this review can found in issue 15: Change) This intriguing story is plotted around Rachel Adams and a firmly kept secret within the shadow of a brutal leader in the city – state of Baalboden. Unlike other girls who opted for…

Issue 14’s Review: Death of a Bachelor (album)

Issue 14’s Review Death of a Bachelor by Panic! At the disco A review by editor Ana Neves (this review can be found is issue 14: Bittersweetness) A lot of people feel betrayed that Brendon Urie is still performing on his own under the moniker of Panic! At the Disco. The band has been known…

Issue 13’s Review: Closer (play)

Issue 13’s Review Released February 2016 Closer (play) by Patrick Marber A review by editor Kate Lomas Glendenning (this review can be found in issue 13: The Shadowed Side) An important feature of a good play is dialogue. The expressions, actions and scenery are minor to dialogue and character development in Patrick Marber’s play, Closer. Marber captured moments…

Issue 12’s Review: The Power of One

Issue 12’s Review The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay (1989) A review by editor Dylan Dartnell (this review can be found in issue 12: Small and Potent) Set in South Africa, The Power of One surrounds the character of Peekay during the closing years of WWII and well into the apartheid years following. We are…

April’s Review: Ophelia

April’s Review Ophelia (2017) By Breanne McIvor (Illustration by Timothy Greene) A review by editor Dylan Dartnell I am sure no one remembers their first crush with much fondness. In fact, I am even more certain that those are memories we all suppressed until it was safe to laugh about without feeling the sting of…

March’s Review: That Eye, the Sky

March’s review Editor Kate Lomas Glendenning reviews Tim Winton’s classic That Eye, the Sky. That Eye, the Sky is one of Tim Winton’s earlier works before Cloudstreet propelled him to fame. Winton’s writing style is distinct and rich in prose. His style at first appears jarring against his point of view, that of a pre-pubescent boy,…

December’s review: Saga (Vol. 1)

December’s Review Saga (Vol. 1), writer Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Fiona Staples A review by editor Shelley Timms When I first heard about Saga, there was a lot of hype surrounding it on Goodreads and YouTube. People loved it. And, being someone who wasn’t really into graphic novels, I didn’t quite understand why. I…

November’s review: Fly the Colour Fantastica

November’s Review Fly the Colour Fantastica: A comic anthology, featuring comic artists Natasha Sim, Sheree Chuang, Alisha Jade, Viet-My Bui, Alicia Braumberger, Eevien Tan, Sai Nitivoranant, Rebecca Hayes, Eri Kashima, Sam Jacobin, Nadia Attlee, Vikki Ong A review by editor-in-chief Jemimah Fly the Colour Fantastica is a collection of short comics, each one its own self-contained…

September’s review: The Little Prince

September’s Review The Little Prince (Le Petit Prince) by Antoine de Saint-Exupery A review by editor Kate Lomas Glendenning The Little Prince is a beautiful, classic novel that children and adults alike adore. Le Petit Prince has continued to stand the test of time since its publication in 1943. It was first published in French, with illustrations by the author…

August’s review: The Cuckoo’s Calling

August’s Review The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith (pen name of J. K. Rowling) A review by editor Dylan Dartnell Warning: This review may be considered blasphemous in some literary circles. I apologise in advance. Robert Galbraith’s The Cuckoo’s Calling hit the shelves in 2013, and since then, we have come to realise that this…

June’s Review: The Dressmaker (book)

June’s Review 12th June, 2016 Warning: this review contains slight spoilers A review by editor-in-chief Jemimah Halbert The Dressmaker by Rosalie Ham is, at its simplest, an Australian Gothic novel. I read it in large chunks over a long weekend, becoming fully immersed in the dusty town of Dungatar, its gossiping inhabitants, and the story…

May’s Review: The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August

May’s Review The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North A review by editor Shelley Timms The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August is a time travel story with a difference. He lives, he dies, and then he starts over again; in the exact same place he was born, and with all of…

March’s Review: The Hunting Ground (documentary)

March’s Review The Hunting Ground, a documentary directed by Kirby Dick A review by editor Shelley Timms It’s not often that a film leaves me seething. The Hunting Ground, Kirby Dick’s 2015 documentary about college sexual assault, did just that. I discovered this documentary while watching the 2016 Oscars, when Lady Gaga performed ‘Till It Happens…

January’s Review: The Fifth Wave (book)

January’s Review The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey A review by editor Candace Sharpe Am I the only avid reader that feels the bittersweet dread when the announcement of a favourite book is to be re-created on screen? To know that the words on a page that pulled you out of your own world and…

December’s review: The Book Thief (book)

December’s Review The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak A review by editor Jessica Wilson-Smith Despite classified as a “young adult” novel, Marcus Zusak’s The Book Thief is anything but that. Set in WWII Germany, the novel is painstakingly structured to cause as much heart-ache in the reader as possible and still be a work of…

November’s Review: Life Partners (movie)

November’s Review Life Partners (2014) Directed by: Susanna Fogel Starring: Leighton Meester, Gillian Jacobs & Adam Brody A review by editor Shelley Timms Susanna Fogel’s indie gem Life Partners tackles the typical best friend/new boyfriend conflict seen in many romantic comedies. When taken on face value, the low-budget, GLAAD Award nominated comedy may seem a…

September’s Review: The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips

September’s Review The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips by Michael Morpurgo A review by editor Ailish Beahan Michael Morpurgo, a popular author of school age fiction, is well known for his books Why the Whales Came, A Medal For Leroy, and Kensuke’s Kingdom. Set in 1943, The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tips is a well-woven…

July’s Review: Peter and Alice (play)

July’s Review Peter and Alice (play) by John Logan A review by editor Kate Lomas Glendenning Peter and Alice is John Logan’s play about Peter Llewelyn Davies and Alice Liddell Hargreaves, two of the most famous muses in children’s literature. They are more commonly known as the children whom inspired J.M Barrie’s novel, Peter and Wendy and…