Issue 31: Sci-fi has arrived!

Cover art by Lola Issue 31: Sci-fi can be downloaded for FREE here Issue 31: Sci-fi features short stories from Jake Dean, Rachelle Erzay, Rob Johnson and Kirstie Nicholson, exploring themes of futurism, technology, space, voyages, and robots, but also families, friends, communities, and living beyond survival. Inside you’ll also find a book review of…

Years later: Reflecting on your own writing, by Jess Rae

I read a short story I wrote 10 years ago and I have some thoughts… COVID-19 self-isolation has meant spring-cleaning time for my family and I. For clarification: we have a shed that is the family’s dumping ground. In the midst of cleaning it recently we came across boxes of all our primary school documents…

How To Support Yourself and Other Authors While Self-Isolating by Jess Rae

Image from Pixabay free images We’re in an unprecedented time. Stores, restaurants and entertainment venues are closed; people have lost their jobs; we can’t see more then one person without being fined. It is a truly scary and lonely time. I don’t know about you but I’m attempting to use this extended ‘me-time’ as a…

Issue 29 release!

Cover art by Liana Wright The first edition of the Underground Writers zine for 2020 is here! ‘Romance’ is special because, apart from being our 29th issue, it marks the first issue since 2015, that Jemimah has not compiled the issue, instead mentoring another editor on how to assemble it. Since Underground is about expanding…

Review: Invisible Boys by Holden Sheppard, by Jess Rae

Trigger Warnings: This book contains suicide, abuse, homophobia and alcohol. If any of these topics are a potential hazard to you this might not be a book for you. Favourite quote: “I run down the hotel corridor, each day of the past week flashing before my eyes, a whole row of tombstones in the cemetery…

Underground Writers 10 Years On

On Friday, November 1st 2019, Underground Writers held a birthday party at PICABar in Perth to celebrate 10 years supporting Australian emerging writers. Our full team of editors were in attendance, and we were joined by a large crowd of supporters. What follows is the speech given on the night by our Editor-in-Chief, Jemimah Halbert…

Review: Not Bad People by Brandy Scott, by Jess Rae

Title: Not Bad People Author: Brandy Scott Publisher: HarperCollins Genre: Thriller/mystery Isn’t it funny that the books we’re drawn to read reflect a little in what’s going on in our own life? This book came to me when I was trying to figure out some of my own friend-related troubles; mind you mine don’t involve…

How To Create a Compelling Villain, by Jess Rae

Image from the Victorian Illustrated Shakespeare Archive I recently re-watched all the Harry Potter films and whilst doing so found myself rolling my eyes at “he-who-shall-not-be-named.” I found Voldemort to be, quite frankly, rather boring, with boring motives; his followers were far more interesting. It got me thinking about villains I do enjoy in series…

Issue 24 has arrived!

Issue 24 has arrived! The cover this issue was designed by WA-based artist Jonathan Park, whom you can find on Instagram at @fresh_kb Our Editors shone throughout this year, and they’ve worked hard on the short stories and poems you’ll find within the pages of issue 24. Download the issue for a fresh assortment of short…

Review: Neverland by Margot McGovern, by Jess Rae

Issue 23’s review Neverland (2018) Margot McGovern  Review by Jess Rae (this review can also be read in the Underground zine, issue 23: Cast) Title: Neverland Author: Margot McGovern Genre: YA Mental health/fantasy Favourite Quote: “Never yield.” Trigger warning: This book review deals with the subject of depression, anxiety and self harm. Please be aware…

Issue 23 is here!

Issue 23 is here! This issue features our first ever visual storytelling piece: South Pacific by Louise Falconer. Our short stories are from Bayveen O’Connell with The Sun on the Snow Grave and Tea With a Bun by Margaret Pearce. Our poetry comes from repeat author Allan Lake with Winter Sunshine, and newcomers Wendy Lichtenberg with how beauty feels, Sara Morgillo’s Bugs Taught, and…

Issue 22 release!

Issue 22: Pop! is here! This issue we’re very happy to have our cover designed by the talented Perth-based Alisa Dempster—you can follow her work on Instagram @trexia.art. We have both new and familiar authors this issue, hailing from Australia and further afield: our poetry is brought to you by Pat Tompkins of the San…

Issue 21: Mythological Figures

Issue 21: Mythological Figures is here! This issue is packed full of poetic goodness form MTC Cronin & Peter Boyle, Alys Jackson, Elise Kelly, and Maddie Godfrey; with room to sink your teeth into short stories from Jude Bridge, Sian Tondut, and Antony Millen. There’s a whole lot of re-tellings, re-visitings, revisions, and cheeky adn…

Australian titles reviewed in 2017!

Below are all the Australian titles reviewed by Underground Writers in 2017!     The Other Woman by Kylie Jones, reviewed by Kate, Shelley, and Jess Rae That Eye, the Sky by Tim Winton, reviewed by Kate Lomas Glendenning Rubik by Elizabeth Tan, reviewed by Jess Gately Portable Curiosities by Julie Koh, reviewed by Jemimah…

Issue 20: Nostalgia

Issue 20: Nostalgia is here! This issue you’ll find some excellent poetry by Allan Lake, Jan Price and Bradley Baronner, a few delectable short stories by Sarah Widdup, Jane Downing and Caitlin Farrugia, and a whole lot of fond and bittersweet Nostalgia: from places and people to time and things. We’re especially excited about our…

Issue 19: The List is here!

Issue 19: The List has arrived! Featuring a book review by our own Shelley Timms, poetry from Eileen Chong, Genevieve Deeds-Page, Kristin Martin, Anna Jacobson, and Pat Tompkins, an album review by Nick Crameri, and short stories from Ian Adams, Edward Palumbo, Angela Hooks, and Meesh Feraud. Also featuring our June Writing Challenge winning entry: The Road…

8 Tips for Starting a Blog, by Jess Rae

8 Tips for Starting a Blog by editor Jessica Rae Wilson-Smith Last month, in an effort to build my freelance business, I started writing a beauty blog. If anything it’s become a creative outlet of mine and I have been enjoying it so far. However, the Internet is forever, and with so many blogs out…

Review: The Other Woman by Kylie Jones, reviewed by Kate, Shelley & Jess Rae

Issue 17’s Review The Other Woman by Kylie Jones (self-published) A collaborative review between Shelley Timms, Jessica Wilson-Smith, and Kate Lomas Glendenning (this review can be found in issue 17: The Hitchhiker) The Other Woman is the heart-wrenching true story of a woman coming to terms with her husband transitioning into a woman, and subsequent…

Issue 16’s Review: Am I normal Yet? by Jess Rae

Issue 16’s Review Am I Normal Yet? By Holly Bourne A review by editor Jessica Wilson-Smith (this review can be found in issue 16: Normal?) Am I Normal Yet? is a contemporary look at what it’s like to struggle with a mental illnesses and being a young girl in today’s society. As Book 1 of…

Issue 18: Black Hole is here!

Issue 18: Black Hole is here! Featuring a review by our very own Jessica Gately, poems from Anthea Yang and Jan Price, and short stories from Carmenn Alexander King Kocznur, Nerissa Marcon, Mai Nguyen, and our feature piece from Fleur Brown-Beeby, as well as the usual monthly round-up of writing opportunities. Also revealing the theme for…

Issue 17: The Hitchhiker is here

Issue 17: The Hitchhiker is here! Featuring poetry from Jan Price and short stories from Jane Downing, Kerri Turner, Daniel Campbell, Carmenn Alexander King Koczur, Aline Mwezi-Niyonsenga, Cindy Tomamichel, feature piece from Sarah Giles, and our first collaborative review, by editors Kate Lomas Glendenning, Shelley Timms and Jessica Wilson-Smith, ofåÊKylie Jones’ autobiographical workåÊThe Other Woman….

December’s review: The Book Thief (book), by Jess Rae

December’s Review The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak A review by editor Jessica Wilson-Smith Despite classified as a “young adult” novel, Marcus Zusak’s The Book Thief is anything but that. Set in WWII Germany, the novel is painstakingly structured to cause as much heart-ache in the reader as possible and still be a work of…