Literary Halloween Costume Ideas, by Jess Rae & Kate Lomas Glendenning

We’ve reached that time of the year again … Halloween! It’s always fun to dress up on Halloween, but how do you decide what to wear? Do you try and fit in amongst the masses, or do you strive to stand out? Instead of dragging out your old white sheet ghost costume with mysterious yellow stains on it perhaps have a look at this list below.


Fantasy
Pull out the memorabilia you’ve been collecting the majority of your life and flaunt it! Wrap your Hogwarts scarf around your neck to brave the (possibly) chilly night and show off your house colours loud and proud! Braid your hair and pop a mockingjay pin on to emulate Katniss as you prowl the streets for treats. Dress up as a Star Wars character and hold your light saber close as you cautiously round corners. If you wanted to go with something more obscure, how about the White Witch from The Chronicles of Narnia? Or put on some elf ears and turn yourself into a faerie from either of Sarah J Maas’ series. These costumes might be harder for the general public to recognise, but for those who identify with your costume, it will make their night.

Children’s
Don’t the waves of nostalgia hit you when you see someone dressed up as a beloved children’s literary figure? Why not dress up as Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland, or the Little Prince? Perhaps spice things up and go as a villain: The Wicked Queen, Scar, or Jafar. Given the reboot of Anne of Green Gables, perhaps we will see lots of little Anne-with-an-e’s running about this Halloween.

Historical
Whilst chucking on a ball gown seems like a hoot, why not try and emulate a historical figure? Pile up your hair and powder your face to look like Marie Antoinette. If you love a bit of blood and gore, you could even paint a red line around your throat to mark where Anne Boleyn was beheaded.

Horror
All horror fans rejoice at Halloween since this is the time you can get away with scaring the living day lights out of people! Why not dress up as a classic horror figure such as Frankenstein’s monster (remember: Frankenstein was the scientist, NOT the monster), Dracula, Texas Chain Saw Massacre’s Leatherface, or IT – lets be honest, most clowns chill people to the bone. The brilliant thing about horror is you can choose to dress up as the victim or the perpetrator, but then again, the line between both can be blurred. It’s always fun to have a heated argument with someone over who was the real monster: Frankenstein, or his invention? Maybe it’s one or the other, or maybe it’s both, or maybe it’s neither! A costume that encourages conversation is great to wear to a party where you aren’t familiar with all the guests.

Celebrity
A Halloween on this earth will never occur without one Marilyn Monroe in her iconic white dress. Dressing up as a celebrity is a fun way to embody a person you admire. Put on that little black dress and large sunglasses and you’ve transformed yourself into Audrey Hepburn’s Holly Golightly, or grab a wedding dress with puffed sleeves and you’ve made yourself into Princess Diana.

Items, ideas, movements
Just like Ted dressed up as a hanging chad in How I Met Your Mother or Zoe dressed up as Picasso’s Blue Period in Fanboys, transform yourself into an item, idea or movement. This is a category you most likely won’t find in your supermarket’s Halloween dress up section, but you will have a lot of fun making!

Group
What’s more fun than dressing up for Halloween? Dressing up as a group of course! You could go the sweet route and go as Christopher Robin’s friends: Winnie the Pooh, Tigger, Piglet, and personal favourite Eeyore. You could go the slightly scarier route and dress as the Volturi from Twilight. You could even go the more scandalous route and dress as scantily clad rabbits from Watership Down! Group outfits can be difficult to co-ordinate, so remember; if you decide not to wear your group costume, let your group members know! Georgia from Angus Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging can attest to the humiliation in showing up to a party in an olive costume (with the idea of your group all dressing up as hors d’oeuvres) and finding all your friends in different costumes.

Even if you don’t choose one of the costume ideas on this list, I hope it has inspired you! Comment below on your favourite Halloween costumes inspired from books.

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